Opinion

From Paul Dail:

After a brief stint as an op-ed writer, I came to three conclusions. First, there’s a big difference between having an opinion versus putting it out there for the whole world to see and judge and criticize (and I don’t just mean on Facebook). Second, I have a much deeper respect for those brave enough to do so regularly. Third, confident as I am with my beliefs, I’m glad I don’t have to publish them anymore if I don’t want to.

You can read the following three excerpts (with links to full articles) or find Paul Dail’s complete portfolio at https://pauldail.contently.com/.

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College students have a right to complain; they’re just not entitled to results

Paul-students-complain
Photo by Linda Goldstein / CC BY-SA 3.0

Recently I read a New York Times article about Everett Piper, the president of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, who wrote a post on the university’s website in response to a complaint from one of the students. The student complaint came following a sermon on the topic of 1 Corinthians 13. “It appears that this young scholar felt offended because a homily on love made him feel bad for not showing love,” Piper stated. “In his mind, the speaker was wrong for making him, and his peers, feel uncomfortable.” The post was titled “This Is Not a Day Care. It’s a University!”

Beyond the headlines, sound bites, and quick scans, I haven’t followed in depth all the recent news regarding college student protests at places like the University of Missouri, but the general consensus I’m picking up on from readers is that college students shouldn’t be complaining. I see Facebook memes saying they should just be happy they’re not dying on the shores of Normandy or in Vietnam …

The general consensus I’m picking up on from readers is that college students shouldn’t be complaining.

Read full article here.

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It’s possible to be non-Mormon in Utah without being anti-Mormon

Paul-nonMormon-featured
Image: “Martyrdom of Joseph and Hiram Smith in Carthage jail, June 27th, 1844” (public domain)

Sometimes it feels like everyone in Utah is looking for a fight, and just like some of the greatest fights in history [read: wars], the foundation of these conflicts revolves around religious differences.

It bothers me to see such contention in what is arguably the most beautiful state in the Union. Maybe my friend in college was right when he said Utah would be the best state if it weren’t for the people. So perhaps it’s time that some Utahns leave the state for a little while.

Perhaps it’s time that some Utahns leave the state for a little while.

This goes for both sides of the dispute. Non-Mormons in Utah need to live somewhere else for awhile, whether they moved to Utah without an understanding of the true depth of the religion in this state or have lived here all their life. Likewise, every Mormon in Utah needs to live somewhere else for awhile, whether they have spent their whole life here or moved here because of the safe haven that has been granted their people since 1847. …

Read full article here.

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Citizenship test for high school graduation a good idea, poor execution

CitizenshipTest copy
Stock image, The Independent

On Saturday, Feb. 14, The Independent reported on SB60, the American Civics Education Initiative. Proposed by Sen. Howard Stephenson of Draper, SB60 would mandate high school students to pass the same citizenship test taken by immigrants seeking United States naturalization. However, the students would be held to higher expectations, both in the number of questions they would be asked and the percentage required to pass.

First off, let me dispel the notion that this isn’t an important issue and that legislators are wasting their time on it. The fact of the matter is that at the heart of SB60’s stated intent, Stephenson is correct in asserting that we live in a largely uneducated society when it comes to the workings of our government.

We live in a largely uneducated society when it comes to the workings of our government.

This lack of knowledge transfers into several aspects of society, not the least of which I believe is voter turnout at national and local elections. …

Read full article here.

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